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Men die in Ontario crashes at a higher rate than women

According to OPP data released on March 23, twice as many men die in traffic accidents than women. This was the case between 2005 and 2014, when 2,358 male fatalities were recorded compared to 1,146 female fatalities.

Out of the total 3,504 accident deaths over the 10-year-period, 7 per cent were pedestrians, 23 per cent were passengers and 70 per cent were drivers. There were only 42 passenger deaths recorded in 2014, which OPP say was the lowest recorded during the decade. In the crashes, only 450 motorists were driving appropriately.

Over the period, 279 motorcyclists died in crashes, and only 74 of them did not do anything wrong. This shows that motorcyclists continue to be vulnerable on provincial roads. In transport truck crashes, there were nearly 700 fatalities among the occupants of other vehicles. Additionally, 92 of the truck drivers died in the crashes, but only 22 of them were driving appropriately.

The age group with the highest number of fatalities for men was 25 to 34. This same age group had the highest rate of death associated with seat belts as well. However, there were encouraging numbers among the children and teen groups. In 2005, there were 68 child and teen fatalities, and this dramatically decreased in 2014 to 20 fatalities.

The effect of a fatal car accident has the potential to last for the rest of the survivors' lives. The cause is often poor driving behaviour, such as multitasking behind the wheel or speeding. To mitigate the financial impact of a fatal crash on the survivors, they could be awarded compensation for their losses through wrongful death claims. The survivors may put their cases into the hands of lawyers who may be able to help them avoid financial insecurity.

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